Looking for writers!

Looking for writers!

Are you interested in having your work published online? If so, please leave a comment or email me with a writing sample and some information about yourself. I would love to help promote some up and coming writers and collaborate with other fans of the Fiat 500!

  • gedney

    i absolutely love the 500 my first car was an 850 sedan and i currently own an Italian built 1973 mini cooper innocenti.I am going to buy the hottest version of the 500 and sell my 2004 mini cooper s . I love small cars i think big cars and suv”s are a waist of time.PLease bring the turbo to the USA.

  • jz

    When I was growing up in Europe in the 70’s, Fiat was a respected mark. The Soviet Union even knocked off a few Fiat models under the state’s Lada brand.
    To me, the most noteworthy was the Fiat 600 which looked very similar to the current 500.. in a 60’s kind of way. Its major downfall was the 600 cc engine it was named after.
    The US seems to have had a love/hate relationship with Fiat. Based on what I have seen thus far, that can be mended if Fiat stays on course.

  • http://NA James T. Baker

    I stayed alive long enough; and lived to see Fiat’s return to the U.S.A. I started buying these little gems in 1980 and since then have owned at least a dozen 124’s, 128’s, 131’s and X1/9,s. I worked as a wrench at a Fiat dealership in Santa Fe, N.M. when word came of their departure from the U.S. market. I responded by buying a new 131 Brava from the dealer’s lot for $5200. It was fast, comfortable, and had a spider F.I. engine (no air, oil filter on the bottom). I was in love. And in mourning. But I knew- one day they’d be back.
    Let me clear up a few Fiat myths for those who believe in conventional wisdom.
    First, the Fiat line of the late 60’s and the decade of the 70’s was stylish, innovative, affordable, and, yes, RELIABLE. These little cars were built with an eye toward simple, sensible design; easily repairable with shared parts and an integrated design that represented Italian engineering genius. They were solid, trusty mounts, but Americans came to bemoan their quality for two reasons: Americans don’t believe in preventive maintenence, and Fiat introduced the rubber timing belt to the world. (continued)

  • http://NA James T. Baker

    Another myth: that Fiat left the U.S. in disgrace, with it’s tail between it’s legs, humiliated by the U.S. government’s unyielding attention to the cars’ rust problems. Yes, it’s true, the Fiats did rust when exposed to the recurrent salt showers of east coast winters. But so did Chevy trucks and Ford muscle cars. Only Fiat gained the rusty reputation because it was an “outsider” which could be scorned by the patriotic public.
    In anger, and with considerable Italian pride, Fiat offered to buy back all of it’s cars, rusty or not, and in 1981, every Fiat dealer wrote checks to people who turned in their cars, and then sent them to the crusher.

  • http://NA James T. Baker

    The Myth of Poor Quality started in the very beginning. Small cars in the late 60’s were an oddity on American Roads, with only a few Beetles and MG’s puttering about. The average American didn’t know the difference between a Ferrari and a firetruck. Imagine a small town mechanic’s amusement when a new Fiat 128 came rolling into his gas station. Lifting the hood to check the oil on the UFO and seeing a transverse engine with a rubber cambelt, the Ford Fan would have yelled out, “Hey, Leroy, c’mere and lookit this thing willya! It’s got a sideways engine”!
    As the two gazed at a future they could not comprehend, they had a good laugh at the mechanical oddity.The name Fiat would be laughed at forever any time Good Old Boys got together to down a few brews.
    Fortunately, some Americans had developed a taste for Chianti.